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20121014
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proposition e the city requires businesses it pay a flat 1.5 percent tax on payroll cost for work performed in the city. small businesses with less than 250,000 dollars in payroll costs are exempt from the tax. proposition e would create a new city business tax based on gross receipts rather than payroll costs. under the new system, the tax on payroll cost would be eliminated or reduced. businesses with gross receipts of less than 1 million dollars annually will be exempt from the gross receipts tax. the gross receipts tax rate would vary depending on the type of business and its annual gross receipts from its activity in the city. certain businesses that have their headquarters or administrative offices in san francisco that operate primarily in other locations would pay the gross receipts tax based on payroll costs. proposition e would require the city to phase in the gross receipts tax and phase out the tax on payroll costs over a 5 year period beginning in 2014. if the gross receipts tax revenue exceeds the revenue the city would have received under the tax on the payroll costs, the
applying hotel tax to your rentals. tell us about what happened. >> last wednesday, the tax collector called a hearing to discuss the applicability of the transient occupancy tax to short-term rentals and operators. we were concerned about this tax and its applicability to airbnb and our community. they showed up in great numbers at the hearing. our main concern is that we vote regularly to increase our own taxes. i do not think any of us are completely opposed to taxes. our concern is the tax code was written in 1961, long before the sharing economy existed, the internet, and the new thing we call airbnb. something that was written for corporate hotels and guests should not be applied to something that is entirely new, to permanent residents of san francisco who are occasionally renting out a couch or bedroom to a visitor, with whom the form great lasting friendships quite often. we announced that the entire city family take time to think about whether the existing laws should apply to the new activity or whether we should create new policies and regulations that apply more appropria
proposition a is a temporary 8-year, $79 parcel tax on properties in san francisco. and that money would go directly to supporting city college of san francisco. city college is the largest work force training center in san francisco. we train students. we also help students learn english as a second language and then of course one of our primary missions is to help students, particularly low income and underserved students, move on to 4 year institutions. we serve nearly 100,000 students in san francisco and are a tremendous resource, we think, for san francisco. the last couple years the state budget cuts we faced, $53 million in the last 3 years alone, have really made it a challenge for us to keep our doors open for san francisco students and this proposition a would make a tremendous difference in addressing our fiscal problems right now. >> understood. thank you. starchild, can you present some of the thoughts around the opposition? >> sure. we all believe in people getting an education and having those opportunities be affordable and accessible to them, but city college's financ
payroll tax to gross receipt tax and why? because by doing that we can create jobs in san francisco and keep people in san francisco . the kids are growing up and we want them to stay but we need jobs. i agree with mr. crowley with the police force and make sure that is fully staffed and i have been speaking to the police athletic league and they have a program to breen the teenagers to be interns in the police force and they would feed into the police cadet program. thank you. >> thank you sir. the next question the city's liabilities are projected to increase in the next coming year. s what new or increased fees should it institute and i will repeat the question and we will begin with mr. crowley. >> i would say that one of the bigger things that we will have before us is the gross receipts tax check that norman talked about trading from the payroll tax which is punitive. the next thing i would do is increase the foot print on mos sony center and that brings in a lot of money to the general fund and erect a multi-purpose area and bring in more money to the coffers and a green i
of the rentals are illegal and the hotel tax is not collected. should the city legalize some or all of the arrangements and collect a hotel tax and we will begin with you -- i will be glad to repeat the question. >> i honestly don't know how you would enforce a law like that. of course everyone should pay their fair share but i don't know how you could enforce that. i believe we should standardize the inlaw units, maybe sure they're up to code and regulate any new units but as far as taxation i cannot see how you could actually enforce that and collect the taxes on it. >> thank you sir. mr. yee. >> cheryl i just want to make sure -- >> i can repeat it. there is internet base market for short base rentals and they sublease units to visitors and tourists and many are illegal and the city's hotel tax is not collected. should the city legalize these arrangements and collect the hotel tax? >> i traveled to different countries and i go to the internet and they have hotels and these rentals advertise and i have used these apartments as rentals for either a few days or one week and it's
. it generates $9 million tax revenue a year and the buddhists say in heaven and hell is on everyday. you come into the city, can you go church and come out and go to westportal and get a ticket. i think that is morally wrong and gouging and gouging and eventually it's just bad pr and for the generating 2.5 million dollars on this budget it's senseless and it's just more government putting the throats -- putting the boots on the throat of the average day citizen. >> all right. thank you sir. mr. yee. >> so let's face it. let's not make our parking meters the atm for the city. i mean we really need to support the notion that we don't want meters to operate on sunday, especially in our district, district seven. the business corridors need access to customers and when you charge on sundays and parking meters the same people shopping and at restaurants they're going to go somewhere else. they're going to go to stonestown and the malls and if you believe in the small businesses in the community then we need to support the notion that we're not going to allow for parking meters to operate on
have a payroll tax that taxes job-creation in the city. and that was one of the most negative things we could do when we are trying to do the opposite of creating jobs. so in a discussion very intensely for the first year i made a commitment with the other candidates running for mayor and we agreed and got that consensus together just recently to get rid of the payroll tax and it helps everybody with a fairer tax system so we're incentivizing job-creation. >> it's called proposition e and we all want to vote yes on e, because yes on e reduces the payroll tax and switches the tax to a gross receipts tax. and saves tech companies millions of dollars so that they can go take that money and create new jobs. >> so that helps the billionaires and it also helps people who wants jobs? >> it also helps every small business in san francisco. >> it helps everybody. who is against it? it's those crazy, what are they called? the board of supervisors? >> no, we got a unanimous vote from the board of supervisors. >> oh, they are squared of d scared of you now? >> no matter what convention yo
, wind down pay off the debt so the tax increment in the series is available for distribution to the taxing entities, city, county, bart, schools. free up the taxes generated for distribution to the other entities. in the case of san francisco we do have a lot at stake. a number of these area plans which the commission approved the board approved as i indicated, made or approved, hunters point, mission bay, trans bay, another obligations that need to be implemented, they are in many cases 30 year plants. mission bay, hald done. trans way, just getting started, going for the terminal, housing production, infrastructure needed along folsom, is getting started, 700 acres still left to be done over the course of 20-30 years. what 1483 did, because it is a separate legal entity, apart from the city and county of san francisco, acknowledged that the surviving obligations and successor agencies in fact are not part of the city and county of san francisco is adopted on february 1. on june 27, when the governor signed that bill into law, so-called clean-up, we had to revisit the
coming together on issues that affect all of us, tax reform, housing, fixing our parks and open space, fixing our streets. this year we have come together in an unprecedented way to put these issues to the ballot, because we agree it's the right time for smart and long-term investment in our city and in housing and in parks and in tax reform. together we're putting people back to work and building our city at the same time. now it's time to reform our tax structure. a lot of people ask me, well, mayor, what is this business tax reform? what is it all about? it's very complicated. well, i will tell them it's about real people, about business, and about real jobs. because it's now that we're the only city in the state of california that has a payroll tax, literally a tax on job-creation. it doesn't make sense. so i'm happy to report that we at last are reforming our business tax structure to stop taxing jobs. and help companies large and small to stay here, to grow here, and to continue starting here as well. we need to protect existing jobs and we need to spur job-creation. our co
it the least. if we're going to go out and give tax breaks to twitter, besides the reasoning associated with that, we can't at the same time say we increase your parking or the cost to ride muni and the direct and real impact that has on the lives of ordinary people that. is what my campaign is all about. it might seem like a small issue, parking fees, but by implication, those who can afford it the least, those are the ones without garages. the most important asset you have as a low-income individual is your automobile. i'm on the campaign trail on a daily basis and people lament and almost cry to me because their vehicle has been booted or towed and they cannot get to work. san francisco has to stop raising revenue off the backs of people who can afford it the least. >> thank you, miss johnson. >> if you look on the sheets that has all of our combined answers you will see that i'm one the few people who doesn't support a lot of new taxes. i have served on the sunshine task force and we had a lot of members of public come in front of us, looking for reasons why all of these projects
a business plan. then we look at the three-year tax return and that statement. we do a lot of home care and mom-and-pop shops. we also do start ups. we asked for approval through documents. we work a lot with people who do not know how to file taxes properly. we are mainly focused in san francisco. we are small. we focus mainly on the tenderloin, chinatown, bayview, visitation. we do a lot of expansion. people start small through the credit union and then want to go to the bank. we know we are limited. we cannot afford to give out a big loan. starting from the credit union, we educate them about filing taxes properly and then moving on to the bank, a small one, expansion, and we work with the bank. the bank and credit union are similar. we do allow tax returns, projections. credit unions do not charge an additional loan or processing fee. processing time, on a small loan, -- consumer loans probably a few days. because we require a business plan, sometimes it takes longer. business plans take a while. especially bank statements. we need to see consistent income coming in. so far, a credi
starved for cash for the past ten years as a result of tax cuts the state could not afford that the prior governor put on the credit cards. we need to provide significantly more funding not only through k-12 education which is the birth right of every child to be able to get a quality public education in my opinion and to be able to pursue the dream of a higher education and that is getting further and further out of the reach of children in california because the state does not support education. we need funding, we need to spend it on education. >> so, therefore, do you think that community colleges should perhaps change their focus? one idea is to focus on retraining unemployed workers and upgrading skills for new jobs. do you feel that the state should encourage this? and how? >> if you are making reference to the challenges facing the san francisco community college at this time, i think that there are going to be some very painful and although, necessary, redirection of focus. we have been providing a lot of classes, non-credit classes and classes that don't need to further training
start collecting gross receipts data. i would look at the real estate transfer tax and we were able to add significant revenue that way. he think i'm the only candidate here who has been talking extensively about a commercial tax rent. commercial property owners in the state of california have been on a tax holiday since prop 13 and under the reagan and bush eras. and we could use that revenue to fund our public schools and restore jtor city college. >> thank you, miss selby. >> two of the things that are being done this november and i would love for to you vote for both of them, 30 and 38. those are two measures that would raise money for education and money in education is in dire straits. it's okay to vote for both. i also do support gross receipts. and i'm a small business person, and i wanted to let you all know that i have done sort of looked what i pay now $9,000. i have seven employees and i pay $9,000 a year and i will pay $750. so for small businesses the gross receipts actually does help and does not put the burden on the little guy and it is progressive and so it does
on a number of initiatives, one that we're very proud of is the midmarket payroll tax initiatives. that is to make san francisco much more attracttive to entrepreneurial companies and renovate a blighted area. we're particularly proud of this kind of public-private partnership to move the city forward. now join me in welcoming the city's first asian american mayor and i'm very proud to say a member of the lee tribe, the 43rd mayor of san francisco, ed lee. (applause). >> thank you, judy, very much for that introduction. good morning, everyone. >> good morning. >> it's great to be here at the san francisco chamber and of course the center for economic development here, your breakfast for 2012, it's my pleasure to be here. i walked in as ed from wells fargo was talking and i just wanted to make sure you knew, i am eternally grateful it the chamber, to wells fargo for helping me create 5,200 jobs for our kids. that's a wonderful accomplishment. i've been your mayor for almost two years now and everybody is coming up to me and asking, are you enjoying it? you know, some of the po
. we have seen our revenue cut significantly by taxes that arnold schwarzenegger cut his first day in office. we have a depoll that prop is trying to refill it. we should not have to do it at the ballot box when out of 40 state senators 14 have more power than 26. 14 can veto when 26 want. i tell fifth graders that and they say that is not democracy that is not possible. that is exactly the problem, we don't have democracy on all issues, revenue-related in the legislature, let the majority party do its job and if the voters don't like what the majority party is doing in no one jerry man dered districts change who is in power, it is call democracy. >> continuing on the theme of democracy, and how people engage with their elected officials and with government generally, clearly civic engagement is critical for a safe, strong and a vibrant state and i am curious what you have done and what you will do to encourage appropriate participation in democracy. >> i think that we could probably most simply define participation and democracy aside from community hearings and gatherings is the
. but then that will require some other tax. that would be my big request like everybody else. get america's finances under control and that will take both parties. it will take taxes and it will take reduction in commitments that have been made. it now can be validated. let's get this but do it in a way that exacerbates the uncertain economy. the second -- we have to happen through innovation. whether it is the space program or tax credits for renewable energy. all that is important. we have to keep that going. that will get hard because we will face is demographics. that is my 74th birthday on april 7. i am aware of the and aging population which i have become and we are an aging population relative to what we were. luckily, we have millions of fresh arrivals that are younger and are energetic and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow
your business, with tax -- green your business, tax credits available with that. for non-profit, charitable organizations, we have a workshop coming up. that is helpful for those of you who are looking to access the committee on a durable basis. >> also, on behalf of leader pelosi, i want to thank our panel and her staff. we are tenants in this building. i apologize for the security situation that happened upstairs. if you have concerns about it, please come and see me. i would like to convey those to the landlord here so that it does not happen again. thank you. >> hi, everybody. my name is carmen chu. why don't we get started. with a marking up with the department of small business -- we have been working with the department of small business. this project started when we heard from neighborhood merchants. unfortunately, they had access issues, visibility access issues. we have been working closely with many of our partners year today to educate about these -- many of our partners year today to educate about these issues. also in terms of board guidance. i want to thank
freed man. the idea of neoliberalism is there should be massive, selective tax cuts. margaret thatcher it is there is no alternative. of course that's absurd. there was an alternative. we have to connect the dots to understand what is going on today. i read the chronicle. so what i've done is put together a montage of the murder of public sector, which is going on everyday. in fact all of the public sector is in body shape. public libraries, parks from the municipal to the national level. our character is among the worst in the world. the new deal deals with things in a different way. when i was going to school, california school's were the best. now they are among the worst with the new budget cuts. of course, my university is being privatized. all of the higher education is being privatized. all through the uc system. how do you run a modern state with tax cuts? we resort to desperate, back last november, we were asked to vote to make four indian casinos in san diego county pony up money. i thought this was a joke. they voted to do it. now, the governor proposes to borrow against fu
in the last congress when later closing was speaker of the house. she had had 16 tax cuts signed into law to help small businesses grow and thrive. as we know, during the last 15 years, small businesses account for about 2/3 of the job growth in our country, but when the bush recession hits in 2009, 2010, small businesses were hit particularly hard. small businesses are the center of her agenda. congress under her leadership gave 27 million small businesses tax cuts. two main pieces of legislation -- the small businesses jobs act in the information you have, will create a total of 500,000 jobs and create eight tax cuts. they are all described in the packet you have. also, unleashing up to $300 billion in credit for small businesses to access. there are another eight tax cuts that were passed through a number of different laws. some of our panelists will address those. even though now we are in an environment where there is a republican majority in the house and a slimmer majority in the senate, please note that the leader and democrats are going fight hard to keep their agenda and restart
, opportunity fund. excuse me. but just know that our office, we are in city hall in the tax and treasurer's office, and our office is www.sfgov.org/osb. we have some information on that. if you did not get one of our small business booklets and you want one, please take my card, e-mail me, and we will mail you one as well. immigrate. thank you, regina. for those of you looking to contact these organizations, you can find their contact information in the program you should have picked up when you sign in. for those of you who are prospective entrepreneurs, if we could limit the acronyms and talk more about what those acronyms mean. >> sounds good. thanks, mark, virginia, and leader pelosi for putting on this event, and for all that she has done -- thanks mark, regina , and later pelosi. we have been able to access resources through the sba and the cdfi fund which helps get money to small businesses in this time of need. opportunity fund is not a bank or a government agency. we are an independent nonprofit organization with a mission to provide capital to working people to help them earn, s
about and some are already being worked on including congestion pricing and a downtown transit tax assessment district because downtown businesses are the greatest benficiencies and should be paying their fair share in terms of busing their employees on a daily basis. i think muni has had a shortfall ever since the state gas tax money, since we lost that money and we have to look at how we're going to solve muni's long-term budget problem and get a muni system that is efficient and runs on time and not cutting fares while expanding fees. we can do that with a vehicle license fee on the local level, with a gas tax on the local level and i would like to work with our state legislators to make that possible here in san francisco. >> thank you. miss olague? >> well, again, we have, as most of you know a transit-first policy in san francisco, and in my conversations with the mta, that is their justification for wanting to impose these fees or parking meter usage and what not. but i think that even though i have been a huge proponent of transit first for a number of years and i do suppo
and once we do, it will create jobs, revenue and taxes for the city. we have a whole expansion team. it's' private-public partnership. all partnering to make this thing happen. so what is our goals? is that location has changed dram itally and to work cost-effectively to stay onbudget and deliver the project. so this is the context of where we're looking at. it's right on the lines of new central subway. there will be a moscone stop. we have three separate buildings, south opened 32 years and north opened 20 years and moscone west opened a little over ten years ago. for the study looked at that whole area and looked at the three moscone sites and the two garages, 5th and missing the and the moscone garage between folsom and howard. one of the problems with moscone center it was built basically when the neighborhood was not what it is today. and it was built kind of in independent, isolated area to almost a suburban-type building in what has been a very urban area. we market san francisco as a pedestrian-friendly city and pedestrians are not allowed to walk around the moscone center in
to increase taxes and fees. how will you approach these difficult choices? supervisor chu: we know that our budget deficit is a significant one. at the moment, blooms are around $380 million -- at the moment, it looms around $380 million. we could not meet that gap. i think the city needs to take a balanced approach, and if you take a look at previous years, we have taken a look at things like where are fee revenues, what do those look like? where are the changes in other revenue pictures, whether it is transfer tax or hotel tax or other things that help to improve the picture. in addition to that, how is it that we can really control some of our expenses? i think that in order to address the $380 million budget deficit, we really have to take a look at both sides, revenue side as well as the cost side of things, and i think there are certain things that the city can do right now that might that not impact this year's budget or -- that might not impact this year's budget for next year's budget but will have a long-term effect. i mean pension reform and some of the ways we calculate those li
, and it is a structure that is meant to allow for profit but also to allow for tax-exempt status for donations. i found it really interesting. i found it surprising that other states did not have a similar model. this could also be a model to help budding companies in the future by allowing them more flexibility in how they acquire financing. i'm curious how many of you on the panel are familiar with this type of model and also, i guess this would be directed towards beye -- senator yee, how difficult it would be to bring this model to california. thank you. >> relative to establishing a new financial instrument or a new financial business, it is possible -- i think the question is what is the need for, what is the support for it, and who might be able to carry a bill to allow the to have been. i think one of the selling points is if in fact this new financial structure can be an impetus for new businesses that would generate jobs. i think you are going to hear a welcome applause for something along those lines. not something that i have heard of, but clearly, something that one can look at, and my off
. following up to that, can you give any advice on particular resources that would speak perhaps to any tax benefits, subsidies in place for both domestic distribution of wine, as well as exports? >> why don't we take it off line. i think what is the case, there is a lot of complexity to the incentives that were put into the jobs act for small businesses to take advantage of on expensing equipment, investments and their businesses, as far as the tax treatment of those activities. obviously, as a small-business person, each of you needs to understand, it is complex, but there are a lot of tax incentives and investment in business that you should take aware -- advantage of. >> we have two questions in the back. just to be mindful for everyone's time, we will go for about five more minutes. >> my name is david. i am an internet or entrepreneurs. in general, to the lenders, what type of vanity do you traditionally see approach you for loans, an llc, corp., and who is liable, for whose borrowing the money? >> as a micro lender, we expect the principles, the corporate form, to provide guarantees.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 115 (some duplicates have been removed)